Federal Unilateral and Mutual Mistake Contract Disputes

Contractors can claim mistake of fact in bid claims against the federal government.  When arguing that there was a mistake in bid, a contractor can either raise a mutual mistake of fact (both contractor and government made a mistake in drafting the agreement) or unilateral mistake of fact (contractor mistake)… Read more »

Responsibility Determinations & Business Ethics Bid Protests

Getting non responsibility determinations can cripple your chances of winning a federal government contract. For example, when you submit a government proposal, your past experiences can sometimes take a toll on whether you get the award. More specifically, when the agency issues a non responsibility determination under the FAR for past… Read more »

The Basics of Government Facility Clearances

Government Facility Clearances Having government facility clearances for a government contract involves a decision from a national security perspective, that a facility can be accessed for classified information. As a government contractor, you can be granted a government facility clearance for confidential, secret, or even at the Top Secret level. You must complete… Read more »

Bid Protest- Should I Challenge or Not?

After being denied an award, Contractors across the country face the question of whether to file a bid protest challenging the Agency’s award with the Government Accountability Office (GAO).  While there are a variety of factors that go into this decision, one of the first concerns prevalent among Contractors, is… Read more »

Internal Control Policy & Government Contractor Ethics

Problem: Having an internal control policy can save you headaches and stress as a business entity and as a government contractor. If you are a federal contractor, FAR regulations require you to have written codes of ethics. Sometimes Congress may request an agency to review a major contractor’s internal control policy. Issues… Read more »

Ostensible Contractor Rule

Avoid Mistakes in Bid Protests Federal government contractors often have many questions about the Ostensible Contractor Rule and how it can impact the award of the contract. The bottom line is that if you are submitting government proposals as a small business, you want to stay away from the possibility… Read more »